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Mariya Yusuf (Arabic: دخابة شوسية; Turkish: Mariyat; also called Marya Yusuf or simply Mariya) is an Arabic-Turkish actress. She was the daughter of the Turkish-American novelist Ayse Yusuf and an Armenian family. She is a founding sweedish men member of the Turkish Parliament. In 2006, Mariya became the first Arab-Turkish woman to be elected to Turkey's Parliament. In 2010, she was the first Turkish woman elected to Turkey's presidency. Her family is Armenian, but she is the only one of the three sisters born to Turkish-Armenians to be Turkish citizens. In 2006, Mariya was awarded the Freedom of the Press Award by Turkey's state-run daily newspaper Yeni Safak for her coverage of the events of July 15, 1999, when a number of Turkish politicians, journalists and judges were assassinated. She received the award in an official ceremony at the Presidential Palace in Ankara, Turkey, on July 16. She is a member of the Nationalist Movement Party, or MHP, which is the largest opposition party in Turkey. She has criticized Erdogan for using the term "Islamization of the state" to describe Turkish society. She is also a member of Turkey's ruling party, the AK Party. The MHP was founded in the early 1990s as a nationalist, reformist, and populist party that gained political and social prominence following the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. The party's leader, Devlet Bahceli, was arrested in 2005 and accused of attempting to assassinate President Abdullah Gul, which he denies. The MHP is now in opposition, but its influence remains strong in Turkey.

In the interview, the journalist noted that the Turkish people, especially the youth, have "very limited understanding indian matrimonial sites in canada of how far the government goes with their interpretation of Islam and how far they can go." She cited a young man she met who was a "very religious man" edmonton muslim with a "very good sense of morality" who said he "didn't think about things like rape" and "didn't go to the club with girls who were drunk and passed out." According to the journalist, "it was only when I asked him to look at pictures from his past that he started to realize that he had taken part in raping young girls." The journalist also noted that a number of "pro-government activists" were among her respondents. She stated that "the government did not take responsibility" for the violence against women in Turkey and also that she believes that "the state will not help women" who are victims of violence, even when it is clear that such violence has taken place. In the interview, she also discussed the importance of women's rights and how the "toughest battle" is "over whether or not the government is able to provide women with the same rights as men." The interview is about five minutes long and is not available on YouTube. In the interview, the journalist noted that in her home country, Turkey, women are "not respected by society, they are still not allowed to vote, they are not allowed to wear full-face veil. It's not fair." The muslims marriage reporter noted that the young man she met had expressed his disappointment that he had to choose between being a "good Muslim" and "being a man." She added that "when the government has gone too far, especially with the violence against women and the fact that they are not able to take responsibility when they commit violence, it can be very difficult for the youth to understand and see what is going on." According to the journalist, in her home country, the government "tries to change the culture so that everything is done in a way that is respectful to women and that men will not commit violence against them." The journalist concluded by stating that "for people who have never been to vivastreet pakistani a bar or party, this can be very confusing." "As a Turkish woman, I think I understand why people are worried. If you are going to have a bar, I mean it's a good place to be, a place where you can go and feel a bit comfortable, then it's probably not a place you should be drinking. But it's also sex dating bristol true that for most of these young people, this is a place where they don't feel safe." According to the journalist, the young man she met had expressed his disappointment that he had to choose between being a "good Muslim" and "being a man." She added that "when the government has gone too far, especially with the violence against women and the fact that they are not able to take responsibility when they commit violence, it can be very difficult for the youth to understand and see what is going on." In the interview, the journalist noted that in her uae girls home country, women are "not respected by society, they are still not allowed to vote, they are not allowed to wear full-face veil. It's not fair." She also noted that the young man "in his home country has been told that he must be a good Muslim or be a man and his family will not accept him. He said that for him to be a man was the only way to make his family accept him." The reporter further explained that "a lot of them think they have to prove themselves. They don't have the luxury of a conversation with their family that could actually change their minds. If you try and explain to them that what you are doing is not wrong, they are still going to hate you. It's a very serious issue. And I think for a lot of these young men, they don't even know what the word 'no' means." She added that one of the young men she met "told me that he was really angry that his father was mad at him for not doing enough of the chores at home." This is part of a bigger problem: "Most of them don't have their own homes; they live with their families, and they do have a sense of community." The reporter asked a young man with an accent, "You don't know anything about Muslims? Why do you want to marry? Do you know who I am? Do you know the country I'm in? I know what it's like here." The reporter also noted that "when we went to the mosque, a group of them all came out and started to chant a lot of curses at us.